Close the window
Art Limited

Andy Warhol

From A to B and Back AgainThe Museum of Modern Art, Mixed media, New York, United-States
Sunday May 19, 2019 - Monday September 2, 2019
Ends in 73 days 1h

Few American artists are as ever-present and instantly recognizable as Andy Warhol (1928–1987). Through his carefully cultivated persona and willingness to experiment with non-traditional art-making techniques, Warhol understood the growing power of images in contemporary life and helped to expand the role of the artist in society.

Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, Paramount, 1984–85; private collection; © 2019 The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / ADAGP, Paris / ARS, New York; © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, Paramount, 1984–85; private collection; © 2019 The Estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat / ADAGP, Paris / ARS, New York; © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Skull, 1976. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 72 × 80 in. (182.9 × 203.2 cm). Collection of Larry Gagosian. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Superman, 1961. Casein and wax crayon on canvas, 67 × 52 in. (170.2 × 132.1 cm). Private collection. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Superman © and ™ DC Comics, courtesy DC Comics. All rights reserved
Andy Warhol, Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962. Silkscreen ink, acrylic, and graphite on canvas, 82 3⁄4 × 57 1⁄8 in. (210.2 × 145.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art 68.25. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Mao, 1972. Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and graphite on linen, 14 ft. 8 1⁄2 in. × 11 ft. 4 1 ⁄2 in. (4.48 × 3.47 m). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize and Wilson L. Mead funds, 1974.230 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Debbie Harry, 1980. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 42 x 42 in. (106.7 x 106.7 cm). Collection of Deborah Harry. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962; Tate, London; © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Andy Warhol, Triple Elvis [Ferus Type], 1963. Acrylic, spray paint, and silkscreen ink on linen, 82 1⁄4 × 118 1⁄2 in. (208.9 × 301 cm). The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art FC.556. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, Paramount, 1984–85. Acrylic on canvas, 76 × 105 in. (193 × 266.7 cm). Private collection. © 2018 Jean-Michel Basquiat Estate. Licensed by Artestar, New York. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1963–64; Cingilli Collection; © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Share this page on FacebookShare this page on TwitterShare this page on PinterestShare this page on LinkedInShare this page on TumblrShare this page on BufferShare this page on StumbleUponShare this page on RedditShare this page by E-mail
This exhibition — the first Warhol retrospective organized in the U.S. since 1989 — reconsiders the work of one of the most inventive, influential, and important American artists. Beneath the glamour of Warhol’s wide-ranging creations is a deep engagement with the social issues of his time that continue to resonate today.

Stretching across three floors of SFMOMA, featuring a dozen works unique to this museum, and building on a wealth of new materials, research, and scholarship that has emerged since the artist’s untimely death in 1987, this exhibition reveals new complexities about the Warhol we think we know, and introduces a Warhol for the 21st century.

Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again is organized by the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

The exhibition positions Warhol's career as a continuum, demonstrating that he didn't slow down after surviving the assassination attempt that nearly took his life in 1968, but entered into a period of intense experimentation. The show illuminates the breadth, depth, and interconnectedness of the artist’s production: from his beginnings as a commercial illustrator in the 1950s, to his iconic Pop masterpieces of the early 1960s, to the experimental work in film and other mediums from the 1960s and 70s, to his innovative use of readymade abstraction and the painterly sublime in the 1980s. His repetitions, distortions, camouflaging, incongruous color, and recycling of his own imagery challenge our faith in images and the value of cultural icons, anticipating the profound effects and issues of the current digital age.

This is the largest monographic exhibition to date at the Whitney's new location, with more than 350 works of art, many assembled together for the first time.

The exhibition is organized by Donna De Salvo, Deputy Director for International Initiatives and Senior Curator, with Christie Mitchell, senior curatorial assistant, and Mark Loiacono, curatorial research associate.

The accompanying film program is co-organized with the Andy Warhol Museum, Pittsburgh, and curated by Claire K. Henry, assistant curator.

Leadership support of Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again is provided by Kenneth C. Griffin.

Bank of America is the National Tour Sponsor.


In the news


"It explores tensions between conformity and innovation, celebrity and privacy, and examines how Warhol expressed commentary and desire in his art."
—PBS News Hour"

"A sweeping retrospective shows a personal side of the Pop master — his hopes, fears, faith — and reasserts his power for a new generation."
—The New York Times

"It can be guaranteed that 'From A to B and Back Again' will prove an inescapable cultural event. It also promises an equal intellectual bonanza.”
—Artforum

“'To humanize Warhol and get people to actually look at what he made is not as easy as it might sound.’ Now Ms. De Salvo is tackling that challenge in 'Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again,' the first Warhol retrospective organized by a United States museum since 1989.”
—The New York Times

“His 15 minutes of fame will never expire. More than 350 works make up this major retrospective that spans Warhol’s entire career from illustrator to pop icon.”
—Los Angeles Times“

In November, the Whitney Museum of American Art will feature the first U.S. retrospective of Andy Warhol’s art in some three decades, in an exhibition that will occupy a great deal of the institution’s eight-story, High Line-adjacent building.”
—The New Yorker

“De Salvo said she believes that the show will inspire viewers to look past the persona that the artist cultivated during his lifetime.”
—ARTnews

“What more is there to learn about this deeply superficial artist? The Whitney’s brilliant curator Donna De Salvo answers the question with the largest Warhol survey ever, featuring more than three hundred and fifty works.”
—The New Yorker

“Titled 'Andy Warhol — From A to B and Back Again,' it stars a full cross-section of his epochal creations."
—The New York Times

“The heart of Warhol’s idea — that by playing the role of businessman, an artist could turn himself into the latest, living example of a commodification he believed none of us can avoid — was perhaps as revolutionary in its time as Marcel Duchamp presenting a humble urinal as sculpture had been in 1917.”
—The New York Times

“One of its most groundbreaking aspects will be the concentration on the least-known time of Warhol’s life, the 1950s.”
—W Magazine

"All the possible aspects of his four-decades-long, multilayered practice, meticulously analyzed and presented."
—Widewalls

“Andy is in the air we breathe. Among the most revolutionary artists who ever lived, Warhol (was) an artist in a state of creative grace feeding on, mirroring, doubling, and actually changing the culture he pictured. The Whitney’s new retrospective…isn’t to be missed.”
—New York Magazine

"A remarkably handsome and topical show.”
—WNYC

“De Salvo aims to offer a unique perspective on his work—a personal one. She looks behind Warhol’s carefully constructed mask to explore how a gay man raised by Czech immigrants in a Catholic family became one of the world’s most experimental artists.”
—Artnet

“The wonderful thing about the Whitney show is that it places Warhol’s famous moments alongside the moments you have likely never seen or heard of… "
—The Daily Beast

“It’s all about Andy!...More than three decades after his death, Warhol’s art continues to draw crowds and remains relevant.”
—CBS New York

“There are plenty of hits— mediated and sequential images, experiments with abstraction, and Popism on full display.”
—Cultured

“The Best Part of the Whitney Warhol Retrospective Might Be His Pre-Fame Drawings of Shoes and Boys.”
—Vulture

"The Whitney’s celebrated Warhol extravaganza explores lesser-known elements of the Pop artist’s oeuvre, including his homoerotic drawings and portraits of men in drag from the 1960s.”
—Artnet

“Warhol didn’t make a mark on American culture. He became the instrument with which American culture designated itself.”
—The New Yorker

"Warhol—a pale, oracular ghost—looms as a spiritual father of this media-saturated age.”
—The Economist
Andy Warhol, Skull, 1976. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on canvas, 72 × 80 in. (182.9 × 203.2 cm). Collection of Larry Gagosian. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts Inc./Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Superman, 1961. Casein and wax crayon on canvas, 67 × 52 in. (170.2 × 132.1 cm). Private collection. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Superman © and ™ DC Comics, courtesy DC Comics. All rights reserved
Andy Warhol, Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962. Silkscreen ink, acrylic, and graphite on canvas, 82 3⁄4 × 57 1⁄8 in. (210.2 × 145.1 cm). Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art 68.25. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Mao, 1972. Acrylic, silkscreen ink, and graphite on linen, 14 ft. 8 1⁄2 in. × 11 ft. 4 1 ⁄2 in. (4.48 × 3.47 m). The Art Institute of Chicago; Mr. and Mrs. Frank G. Logan Purchase Prize and Wilson L. Mead funds, 1974.230 © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Debbie Harry, 1980. Acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen, 42 x 42 in. (106.7 x 106.7 cm). Collection of Deborah Harry. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Licensed by Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Marilyn Diptych, 1962; Tate, London; © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York
Andy Warhol, Triple Elvis [Ferus Type], 1963. Acrylic, spray paint, and silkscreen ink on linen, 82 1⁄4 × 118 1⁄2 in. (208.9 × 301 cm). The Doris and Donald Fisher Collection at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art FC.556. © 2018 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, Paramount, 1984–85. Acrylic on canvas, 76 × 105 in. (193 × 266.7 cm). Private collection. © 2018 Jean-Michel Basquiat Estate. Licensed by Artestar, New York. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Andy Warhol, Self-Portrait, 1963–64; Cingilli Collection; © 2019 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc. / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York

Bullet

write a comment





Bullet

tags

aestheticsandyartartistartisticartsartworkauthorcatalogueconceptcontemporarycreatecreationcreativecreativityeventexhibitexhibitionformatframeimagemodernmomamuseumpicturestyleviewwarholyork
Bullet

event venue

The Museum of Modern Art

MOMA
11, West 53 Street
NY 10019 New York
United-States
T +1 (212) 708-9400
Bullet

about the author

Art Limited EditorsArt Limited Editors
TEAM
Publishers
Bullet

social

PublishedApril 10, 2019 at 09:24pm
Seen4929 times
Join the communityFacebookTwitterPinterestTumblr.LinkedIn
Subscribe to newsletter
© Art Limited, Bordeaux, France - v22.13.4 - All rights reserved 2005-2019